Entrepreneurial Summer Jobs for Teens

An entrepreneurial spirit is a great characteristic to have in business. An entrepreneurial spirit can be nourished in youth by allowing them to create their own summer jobs. Teenagers under 16 may have trouble finding jobs and these suggestions could help them earn some summer income. These suggestions also can work around a busy teens schedule with sports and other activities.

Mowing Lawns

 

Mowing neighborhood lawns is a classic teen job. Teens face a wide variety of competition from professional landscape companies. However, landing a lawn mowing job is lucrative for teens. Teens can earn $30 or more for a normal yard. Large yards can fetch $50 or more. My yard is just over an acre and someone offered to mow it for $50. Lawns need to be mowed multiple times during the season and can provide a steady income all summer.

 

Babysitting

 

Another classic summer job for teens is babysitting. Trust me parents like a night out every now and then for a date night. Paying a reliable teen to keep their child or children safe and careful is well worth the expense. Certifications and licensing could increase the rate a teen charges. Babysitting could lead into a career in childcare. According to Scott Allen in his article teens can make “$8-$12 an hour, depending on the number of kids.” It is also a job that can be done during the school year and is not necessarily seasonal.

 

Pet Sitting

 

Lots of people go on vacation during the summer. Some of those people have pets and it is a lot easier not to travel with them. Paying teens to watch them is a great alternative. The rates will vary depending on how man animals and what types of animals need to be watched. On a recent vacation I paid some kids $20, to check on some cats while I was away. They got the bonus to play with some friendly cats. I got the peace of mind the animals were safe and fed.

 

Water/Soda Sale

 

A twist on the classic lemonade stand is filling a cooler with some bottled waters, a variety of sodas and ice. The teen then takes the cooler to an area like a park, a ballpark, or a sidewalk and sell the cold refreshments. Charging one or two dollars a drink should allow the teen to make a nice profit. One would want to make sure they don’t break any laws or tax rules while doing this job.

 

Sources:

 

Personal experience

 

Create Your Own Summer Job by Scott Allen

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